REVIEW: Into the Magic Shop

Crisply written, full of surprising turns and excellent questions, Into the Magic Shop is both a memoir and an approachable introduction to how our brains work.

James Doty brings two things to the conversation:

  1. His knowledge of the brain as a neurosurgeon
  2. One heck of a life story to tell

James’ mostly absent father drank their money away and disappeared for days. His mother suffered from severe depression, spending most of her time in bed. Then one day, he walked into a magic shop, looking for a trick thumb, met Ruth, and his life changed.

Ruth taught James the most useful magic trick: How to relax both his mind and body. Now we call it mindfulness.

Because Doty learned to manage his thoughts and emotions, to come up with a focused intention for what he wanted to do with his life, he grabbed life and shaped it into something of his own devising. But not without some serious bumps.

He wished for money and success and all its trappings, only to find himself surrounded by riches but not much more. He’s at the top of his game, but considered an asshole.

It is a story about values. About how what we think we value sometimes is what holds us captive. The lesson I appreciate the most is that, it is only when we set ourselves a clear intention that we get where we want to go.

Doty offers a fascinating and thought-provoking journey. Through science and powerful argument, he explains how and why relaxation technique, meditation, opening the heart and setting clear intentions are not just good for you. They are magical powers which, if we all embraced, might make the world a beautiful place.

How actors use these principles

Since Stanislavski, actors learned that the process of relaxation is a key tool to performing on stage. Actors use their minds and bodies as a means to enter into the  character they are playing.

In a process I call “steeping tea” (news reporters call it “gathering string”), actors focus their thoughts to actually change their minds to be more like the character’s. They might:

  • Write a journal for the character for the year.
  • Research on the time period or place where the character lived.
  • Write the story of key chapters in the person’s life.
  • Imagine in as much detail as possible, moments from the story that aren’t included. The moment before they enter a scene, for example. Or a story from their childhood that still pings at them today.
  • And much more…

Then they throw it all away.

The body and the mind are linked quite closely. By using either the mind or the body, they are finding ways to become the character. When they get up on stage, they trust that the “experience” of being that character is in them. They are like a pot of hot water that has been steeped into tea.

How can writers use this?

Writing is a kind of performance. Where an actor is trying to discover how to play a character, as writer you play every role, and cinematographer, set designer and so on.

Exercises like these — the exploration you do explore a situation– can help you take your writing up a notch. That is, use your mind and even your body, to get into the worlds of your characters and the scene you are creating.

You might:

  • Find a song that suits the mood and rhythm of a scene you are writing.
  • Write the “moment before” for each character.
  • Stand up and act out the scene from each character’s point of view.

Close your eyes. Put yourself there mentally. Put yourself there physically. Then see what comes out of your pen.

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REVIEW: Writing Tools

If you write you need this book.

Roy Peter Clarke’s focus is on providing a writer a box of tools. From copy editing to point of view and project management of writing projects, his insights and common sense approach make this the most useful writing book I’ve seen in years. His background point of contact is in journalism, but the lessons can be applied to all writing styles.

My personal favourite is the chapter on generating a story question. Here, he talks about the “story engine” — a concept I first learned about from Sol Stein. Mr. Clarke refines this concept and shows how a question can help a writer to tame those sub-plots.

This is most definitely a go-to resource for editing your work and punching up your prose.

REVIEW: The Art of Memoir

I heard Ms Karr interviewed on the most wonderful podcast, On Being with Krista Tippett and was so intrigued ordered it.

At first I loved the voice in this book on writing memoir. So authentic, honest, gritty and modern. But soon the book became all about that voice. In some cases, the nuggets she attempts to deliver are so much in “her voice” that it’s hard to understand what she means. This book is supposed to help someone write memoir, but there are times when the message is so opaque, it’s unclear.

That’s not to say there aren’t bits of value.

I agree on how writers need to learn how to include the “carnal” in their writing to capture readers. And yet I disagree with the use of the word “carnal.” She is talking about the senses: Visual, auditory, sensory (touch), olfactory, taste. Many a memoir midwife will tell you, the doorway into writing about the past is through the senses. Recalling the smells, tastes, touches brings a writer into the moment, which leads to other memories. But to me, the word carnal implies sex. Of course, a memoirist can dive in between the sheets, but there are so many more planes to sensual experiences. So it’s a quibble, and she very likely has her reasons.

Karr has great points and bits of advice on finding voice, integrating back story, including some excellent examples. I’m normally not keen on authors who use their own books as examples, but she is wise in how she uses them here.

A great bonus is the last section with a list of memoirs and books on writing memoir. Very useful.

I recommend this book for people who are currently working on a memoir, but not just starting one. My reason: This is sold as a synthesis of her great experience in teaching memoir and writing memoir. But it is not a step-by-step how-to. Half of it is skippable. But the nuggets are so valuable, to a writer who has dug in and going would find some great ideas to reflect on and lenses to review their work.